Discourse on COVID-19 and illicit drug toxicity on social media

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by ­CIHR Institute of Population and Public Health (CIHR-IPPH) / Equitable AI, Michael Smith Health Research BC, and the BC Centre for Disease Control (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

 

Ahmed G. T. AbuRaed works on suicidal prediction, information extraction and patient profiling. He has also worked on text summarization and sentiment analysis. His current goal is to analyze discourse on COVID-19 and illicit drug toxicity on social media using twitter and Facebook posts. The public perception could shed some light for the decision makers to regulate drug use the same way they did for COVID.

Impacts of COVID-19 pandemic on diabetes care among South Asian population

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by CIHR Institute of Population and Public Health (CIHR-IPPH), Michael Smith Health Research BC, and the BC Centre for Disease Control (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

 

Bushra Mahmood’s research focuses on disparities in chronic diseases, specifically diabetes among the South Asian population. She will develop a diabetes care cascade and study the impact of pandemic control measures on diabetes care cascade among the South Asian population, who have high burden of Type 2 diabetes. This work will identify gaps and reduce disparities in diabetes care.

Characterizing and diagnosing the source of lead in drinking water in British Columbia

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research (CIHR-IHSPR), Michael Smith Health Research BC, and the BC Ministry of Health (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

 

As a PhD student in civil engineering with a background (MSc) in epidemiology and public health, Kalli Hood is interested in strategies to provide access to safe drinking water. Her research as an HSI Fellow aims to evaluate potential sources of lead exposure in drinking water and its health impacts alongside the BC Ministry of Health.

Analyzing regular and potential blood plasma donor preferences to improve resource allocation of Canadian collection services

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research (CIHR-IHSPR), CIHR Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health (CIHR-ICRH), Michael Smith Health Research BC, and Blood Services Canada (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

 

Blood products have a shelf life and sufficient supplies are dependent on continuously engaging Canadians as blood plasma donors. The goal of Kevin Kennedy’s research is to understand the barriers and incentives that will lead to Canadians donating blood plasma, sustaining the domestic supply necessary for critical health care interventions.

Developing a risk index for multimorbidity surveillance in British Columbia

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by CIHR Institute of Infection and Immunity (CIHR-III), Michael Smith Health Research BC, and the BC Centre for Disease Control (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

 

Jennifer Ferris’ project in partnership with the BC Centre for Disease Control examines disease multimorbidity, which is when an individual has two or more chronic diseases. This project will use data clustering approaches to analyze combinations of specific chronic diseases across the BC population. Their vision is to develop a risk index tool that will improve public health planning around multimorbidity.

Exploring the pathways for legal regulation and recognition of genetic counsellors in British Columbia

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research (CIHR-IHSPR), Michael Smith Health Research BC, and the BC Ministry of Health (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

 

Legal regulation of healthcare providers can protect the public from harm, increase provider autonomy, and increase access to healthcare. Kennedy Borle’s project will explore the regulation of genetic counsellors, who are specialized healthcare providers with expertise providing counselling, education, and support for patients and families to help them understand and adapt to medical and emotional aspects of having a genetic condition.

Implementing a restorative approach in long term care to heal and learn from the harms of COVID-19

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by CIHR, Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR), Michael Smith Health Research BC, and Interior Health Authority (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

 

Long Term Care (LTC) facilities have been the focus of much scrutiny over the last decade, which has intensified with the advent of COVID-19. A restorative approach is a principle-based approach that fosters a relational way of thinking and being and has the potential to promote healing and learning from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Connecting policy making, health care delivery, and population research to address early years health inequities in British Columbia

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research (CIHR-IHSPR), Michael Smith Health Research BC, and the BC Ministry of Health (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

 

Orphée Tamba’s work aims to reduce early childhood inequities in British Columbia by establishing a sustainable process for ongoing collaboration between ministries, health research organizations and systems delivery partners. This will help link and analyze BC population-level data to identify early childhood priorities and improve health equity through informed policies. Orphée hopes to see this approach adopted across Canada and worldwide.

Honouring all our relations: Advancing health and wellness of uncounted Indigenous peoples in BC through addressing gaps in population health and wellness reporting

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by CIHR, MSFHR, and BC Office of the Provincial Health Officer (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

Reporting on the health and wellness of populations is vital to monitor trends, identify priorities, track progress towards targets, and address inequities. All Indigenous peoples — including those who do not have ‘Status’ under Canada’s Indian Act — have the right to be counted. Their perspectives and priorities must guide how data is collected, used, and reported. Yet, at present, First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples who do not have ‘Status’ or are not registered with Metis Nation BC are ‘invisible’ and ‘uncounted’ within population health and wellness reporting in British Columbia (BC).  Responsibility for reporting on health of BC residents lies with the Office of the Provincial Health Officer (OPHO). Through agreements with federal, provincial, and Indigenous governments, the OPHO’s responsibilities include collaboratively reporting on health and wellness of diverse Indigenous peoples living in the province. Currently, there is no process in place to report on health and wellness of “uncounted” Indigenous peoples. This work must be done in partnership with Indigenous collectives representing this population. Current gaps include:

  • No strengths-based, self-determined terminology to refer to diverse Indigenous peoples who are uncounted in population health data.
  • Lack of formal relationships with Indigenous collectives representing uncounted Indigenous peoples.
  • No way of identifying this population in existing BC population health data.
  • Absence of research frameworks that reflect uncounted Indigenous peoples’ perspectives of health and wellness.
  • No implementation plan for province-wide population health reporting led by uncounted Indigenous peoples, on their terms .

The goal of this project is to support the health and wellness of uncounted Indigenous peoples living in BC by addressing current gaps in population health reporting, through partnerships that uphold Indigenous self-determination, decision-making, and perspectives of health and wellness.

Source: CIHR Funding Decisions Database

Qualitative analysis and integration of stakeholder engagement into provincial policy roll out of free prescription contraception: Application of gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

This Health System Impact Fellowship is co-funded by CIHR, MSFHR, and BC Ministry of Health – Population and Public Health (health system partner), to help build BC’s health policy research capacity for the integration of policy research into decision-making.

In late 2020, the Government of British Columbia committed to a policy of free contraception for all. This first-in-Canada policy presents an opportunity to address the cost barrier that limits access to contraception, and to understand and address how other identity factors like race, ethnicity, religion, age, and ability intersect with gender to affect the experience of contraceptive access. The goal of this project is therefore to use a gender and diversity lens called Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) to support the planning, implementation and evaluation of free contraception policy and programs in BC. Specifically, a family planning researcher will work with the BC Ministry of Health to engage with stakeholders about the impact of free contraception on communities known to face various barriers to safe and appropriate contraception care. Stakeholder engagement will be complemented by reviews of the relevant scientific evidence as well as invited presentations from researchers doing work connected to gender, diversity, and contraception. In alignment with the Ministry mandate to provide free contraception for all and addressing systemic discrimination, the results will be shared with policy makers to inform decisions about free contraception policies and programs and will be used to inform templates and guidelines for future GBA+.

Source: CIHR Funding Decisions Database